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Task level

When I create a task with a level one, I get the task under the original and also the same task listed in the main list. Is the correct functionality or am I doing something incorrectly?

Thanks
Richard

All responses

David Trey staff
Replied on Apr 14, 2014 - 12:25 UTC

Hello Richard,

Assuming that you're referring to the 7 days view - that's the correct behavior for this view. It shows all tasks that match the criteria "are due within 7 days" regardless of their indent level. On top of that, you have the option to see what sub-tasks a parent task contains by expanding it. If both match the criteria - that's where you'll see the related sub-task again.

This is the best way we could find to make sure you won't miss any important tasks if they're sub-tasks and match the criteria and at the same time won't display unrelated parent tasks that don't meet the search criteria just because one of their sub-tasks does.


Best regards,
David

Richard premium
Replied on Apr 14, 2014 - 12:34 UTC

Is there anyway that I can set it up so that I can view the subtasks only as a list?

David Trey staff
Replied on Apr 14, 2014 - 13:55 UTC

Richard,

That's not possible. Even if it was, it would mean that when you search for "today", you would see tasks that are not even due today, just because they may have a sub-task due today which you have to find on this list.

On the other hand, removing the option to view sub-tasks of a parent task would mean that you'd have to go back and forth between projects just to check what sub-tasks it has.


Best regards,
David

Richard premium
Replied on Apr 14, 2014 - 15:02 UTC

Ok, well it would be nice to have sub tasks that I only see when I open the
sub task list.

Nienke
Replied on Dec 07, 2014 - 17:21 UTC

"Assuming that you're referring to the 7 days view - that's the correct behavior for this view. It shows all tasks that match the criteria "are due within 7 days" regardless of their indent level. On top of that, you have the option to see what sub-tasks a parent task contains by expanding it. If both match the criteria - that's where you'll see the related sub-task again. "

I use parent tasks as folders, not as tasks that have due dates and that need to be completed. Therefore, seeing the parent tasks in my 'today' view makes matters more complicated, rather than easier. Consider the following scenario:

I share a project with my boyfriend, in which we manage our administrative affairs. One of the things we need to do, is figure out new healthcare. We create a parent level task named 'Get health care for 2015'. Inside of this parent task, we put subtasks. For example, my boyfriend has to get his medical records today, and I need to call our current insurer tomorrow. The way this shows up for me is very complicated: even though *I don't have ANY task to do within the parent task today*, the parent task still shows up in my 'today' view. How confusing! Meanwhile, my boyfriend sees both the 'get medical record' task in his 'today' view, as well as the parent task 'get health care' (which, itself, ALSO contains the subtask 'get medical records'). So he's seeing the same task twice, essentially. Rather than making our life easier, displaying the parent task (including subtasks) AS WELL AS individual subtasks themselves actually made our lives more complicated.

I understand you don't want to change the default behaviour of parent tasks and subtasks, but how about you throw 'power users' a bone here? There's a very simple solution that could be acceptable to all parties: offer a filter criterium based on indent level. This could be implemented similarly to the 'priority' criterium. So parent tasks would be 'indent 0', and subtasks would be 'indent 1', 'indent 2', etc.

So if I wanted a 'today' view without any parent tasks, I could say 'overdue, today, !indent 0'. Neat huh?